About the service

The reaching out service (renamed from Mindful by children and young people) will continue to focus on supporting the most isolated and vulnerable children and young people through a multi-agency network.

While we are already supporting children and young people within vulnerable groups (including young offenders, children in need and those not in education, employment or training) we will increase our reach to work with wider vulnerable groups, for example those not attending school due to social and emotional difficulties as well as adding a service for schools and children in mainstream schools who are at risk of exclusion.

There are three main services that will be delivered:

Vulnerable service

Will encourage those children not in education, employment or training, homeless children and those at risk of being homeless to engage with formal services, and to support them with their mental health needs. The success of this pathway will be based upon its multi-agency approach and ability to foster excellent working relationships with Youth Offending Service (YOS), Criminal Justice and Liaison Diversion service (CJLD), and Race Equality and Minority Achievement service (REMA), amongst many others. 

Education service

We will use the well-regarded approach from Humber Teaching NHS Foundation Trust called SMASH (Social Mediation and Self-Help) model to build and develop an intensive programme to support children at risk of exclusion and the schools involved.

Transition service

Will support young people who are soon to turn 18 as they transition from children and young people’s services to adult services. Adult Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) specialists will identify the most appropriate service for the young person to transition towards and support them to achieve a smooth transition.

What it will offer

Treatments offered to children and young people include: 

  • psycho-education support
  • cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) by Reaching Out practitioners - which could be trauma-focused, activity based engagement, restorative justice or mindfulness
  • independent self-care skills
  • family outreach
  • groups and programmes that are face-to-face through to virtual online groups
  • help to find accommodation and work alongside school or college
  • support for those with ASD and ADHD from the National Autistic Society

What’s new

Within our vulnerable service we already have an outreach programme for 16-25s who don’t usually engage but have needs. Reaching out practitioners go out into the community, and sometimes the young people’s homes, to engage with them. This service will soon be widened to reach and support a younger age group too (age eight and above).

We will also increase our reach to work with wider vulnerable groups, for example those not attending school due to social and emotional difficulties as well as adding a service for schools and children in mainstream schools who are at risk of exclusion.

Coming soon

We are planning to recruit a ‘Mind Matters’ worker specialising in Adult Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) to join the team and support young people (aged 18 – 25) who don’t meet the criteria for adult IAPT.